The Effect of Adding Tannat Skins and Exogenous Tannin to Chambourcin Fermentations (2016)

This study examines the impact that different sources of fermentation tannins will have on the sensory and phenolic qualities of Chambourcin wine. Chambourcin picked at the same time from the same block were crushed and destemmed into four fermentation bins, each with 1.5 tons of grapes. One bin was a control with no exogenous tannin added; the second bind received oak chips and fermentation tannins (Color Max and FT Rouge); the third bin received 75 pounds of Tannat skins; and the fourth bin received oak chips, fermentation tannins, and Tannat skins. All other treatments between lots were the same. In general, adding oak and tannat skins lowered color and phenolic attributes, except that tannin was slightly increased. Adding these compounds seemed to increase catechin and epicatechin. Adding Tannat skins and oak chips together increased catechin and epicatechin and slightly increased color intensity. Descriptors were mixed, and not too many differences could be seen between wines with the descriptors used in this study. In general, judges tended to prefer the Control wine and the wine made with Tannat Skins, Oak Chips, and Tannin added. This study suggests that the effects of adding different sources of tannin are not additive but instead are complex and difficult to predict.

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The Effect of Tannin and Oak Addition on Merlot (2016)

This study examines the impact of adding either VR Supra (Laffort) or both VR Supra and untoasted oak chips on the sensory and chemical qualities of Merlot. Merlot was harvested on the same day from the same block and processed identically into three separate T Bins, one of which was a control, one of which received VR Supra, and one of which received both VR Supra and untoasted French oak chips. All other treatments were the same between groups.  No major differences could be seen in wine chemistry. Color was not impacted much, but the treatments lowered anthocyanins. Adding tannin and adding oak chips increased tannin. The differences between treatments, however, were not that great. Overall, conflicting results were found for the two tastings this project was poured at. At the Shenandoah tasting (May 3), most judges preferred the wine with both Oak Chips and VR Supra, whereas on May 17 that was the least preferred. Oak chips with VR Supra tended to increase Astringency and Bitterness, but this was a weak tendency. These results suggest that these wines could be tailored to meet the demands of different consumer groups. However, the number of judges in these studies were small, and in the future more work should be done on these wines. Additionally, this wine was unusually high in alcohol and extraction due to the vintage, and more of a difference with these treatments may be more observable in different vintages.

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Color and Tannin Extraction and Stabilization in Red Winemaking (ARC) (2016)

This study examines the impact of different tannin addition practices on the color and tannin profiles of Merlot wine. Merlot was harvested from the same block and split into three separate fermentation vessels. One vessel received no tannin or oak chip additions, a second vessel received VR Supra and Lafase HE Grand Cru at processing, and VR Color during fermentation (ARC-Laffort Protocol), and a third treatment received Lafase HE Grand Cru and mini chips bois frais oak chips at processing. All other treatments between wines were equal. Wine chemistry between treatments were the same, except that the control tended to have slightly lower TA. Both treatments increased color intensity and tannin, with the Laffort-ARC protocol having the greatest impact. The treatments slightly increased catechin and gallic acid. The treatments tended to slightly lower anthocyanins, but increased polymeric pigment. No strong trends could be seen for the descriptors used in this study. There was a slight tendency for the control to have higher Fruit Intensity and lower Astringency. The Oak Chips + Grand Cru had a slight tendency to increase Body, Bitterness, and Overall Aromatic Intensity. However, these were weak trends. In general, the ARC-Laffort Protocol Treatment was the least preferred. Several judges described these wines as having slightly oxidized characteristics, and as such these sensory results may not be very representative. 

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The Effect of Toasted and Untoasted Oak Chips and Granular Oak Additions to Red Must (2016)

This study examines the impact of toasted and untoasted granular oak additions to Petit Verdot must. Petit Verdot grapes were sourced identically and processed identically into 4 separate fermentation vessels, one without oak additions, one with untoasted oak chip additions, one with toasted oak chip additions, and one with Xtrachene medium toast French granular oak additions. All other treatments were kept the same between wines. The Xtrachene granular oak exhibited the greatest increase in color intensity, tannin content, and polymeric anthocyanins (suggesting more color stability). Color was only slightly improved by oak chips. Untoasted oak chips and Xtrachene toasted granular oak exhibited an increase in caftaric acid, catechin, epicatechin, and gallic acid. Oak consistently lowered caffeic acid, although the numbers are very small. Anthocyanin extraction was not enhanced by oak, and was even lowered by toasted oak chips. In general, oak saw increases in color, catechin, epicatechin, and tannin, with granular oak resulting in the largest increases. In general, people preferred the control wine. The second-most preferred and least-most preferred wines were made with Granular Oak. No strong trends were found for the descriptors used in this study. The Granular Oak treatment seemed to increase Bitterness, Fruit Intensity, and Astringency more than the other treatments. Toasted Chips appeared to increase Fruit Intensity, along with Granular Oak. However, these tendencies were weak. Wines made with Granular Oak were often described as being oaky or smoky.

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The Effect of Different Products on Merlot Color Stability (2014)

One Merlot wine was made using a mixture of ScottLabs Color Pro, Tannin VR Supra (Laffort), and French oak chips.  The other wine was made with a mixture of Zym Color Plus (Enartis), Tan Fermcolor (Enartis), and Tan Color (Enartis).  Both experimental wines were meant to mimic similar enzymatic and tannin additions.  There were no chemical differences between the wines, and sensory testing was not performed in this project.  No resources to measure color or phenolic content were available for this project.

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